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Thread: This Day in History

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    This Day in History

    Taken from Widenerís email flyer.

    Today In History: October 9th, 1940 - St. Paulís Cathedral Bombed

    During the Battle of Britain, the German Luftwaffe launches a heavy nighttime air raid on London. The dome of St. Paulís Cathedral was pierced by a Nazi bomb, leaving the high altar in ruin. It was one of the few occasions that the 17th-century cathedral suffered significant damage during Germanyís nearly ceaseless bombing raids on London in the fall of 1940.

    According to tradition, a Roman temple to the goddess Diana once stood on Ludgate Hill at the site of St. Paulís Cathedral. In 604 A.D., King Aethelberht I dedicated the first Christian cathedral there to St. Paul. That cathedral burned, and its replacement was destroyed by Vikings in 962. A third cathedral was destroyed by fire in 1087 and was replaced by a grand Norman structure that was completed in the 13th century. In the 16th century, the fourth cathedral fell into disrepair and was damaged by fire, and further harm was done during the English civil wars of the 17th century. In the 1660s, the English architect Sir Christopher Wren was enlisted to repair the cathedral, but the Great Fire of London intervened, destroying Old St. Paulís Cathedral in 1666.

    In the aftermath of the fire, Wren designed a new St. Paulís Cathedral, with dozens of smaller new churches ranged around it like satellites. The cathedral was Wrenís masterpiece, featuring a baroque design and a prominent, stately dome. Wren himself set down the foundation block in 1675 and in 1710 put the final stone in place. When the architect died in 1723, he was buried with great ceremony in St. Paulís. An inscription near his tomb reads, "Lector, si monumentum requiris, circumspice." Latin for ďReader, if you seek a monument, look about you.Ē Many other notable British citizens later joined him in St. Paulís crypts, including the military heroes Lord Nelson and the Duke of Wellington.

    St. Paulís Cathedral became an inspiration to the British people during World War II. In the Battle of Britain, the Luftwaffe attempted to bomb Britain into submission by pounding London and other major cities, but St. Paulís miraculously escaped major bomb damage, even as historic buildings nearby were reduced to rubble. Images of St. Paulís framed by smoke and fire became a symbol of Britainís indomitable spirit. Civilian defense brigades, including the St. Paulís Fire Watch, protected the structure from fire, and at one point an unexploded bomb was removed at great risk from the roof of the cathedral. Despite the damage caused on the night of October 9, 1940, the cathedral survived the Blitz largely intact. In 1944, St. Paulís bells rang out to celebrate the liberation of Paris, and in 1945 services marking the end of the war in Europe were attended by 35,000 people.
    If we could follow 1 Commandment, 'Love Each Other!', it would be enough! -Apostle Paul

    21 Then I saw ďa new heaven and a new earth,Ē[a] for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.

    "Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. The real extent of this state of misinformation is known only to those who are in situations to confront facts within their knowledge with the lies of the day." óThomas Jefferson (1807)

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    From Widener”s.

    This Day In History - Psychopathic Gunfighter “Wild Bill” Longley Is Born In Texas

    Little is reliably known of the youth of William Longley, or “Wild Bill” as he was later aptly called. But it is certain that before he was even 20 years old, Longley had already killed several men, and the evidence suggests he was probably what modern-day psychologists would term a psychopath. Notoriously short-tempered, Longley frequently killed for the most trivial of reasons. More than a few men died simply because he believed they had somehow slighted or insulted him, like an unarmed man named Thomas, who Longley murdered in cold blood for daring to argue with him over a card game. He had a particularly strong dislike of blacks, and African-Americans in Texas avoided him whenever possible.

    Wherever Longley traveled he left behind a trail of pointless murders, but most of the details of his life are shrouded in myth and supposition. Legend has it that Longley was once hanged along with a horse thief, but shots fired back by the departing posse cut his rope, and he was saved. Reports that he was imprisoned for at least a time and once lived with the Ute Indians are more believable, though not confirmed.

    After fleeing to Louisiana to escape punishment for killing a minister named Roland Lay, Longley was captured and returned to Lee County, Texas, where he was tried and found guilty of murder. Sentenced to hang, during his final days Longley became a Catholic, wrote long letters about his life, and claimed that he had actually only killed eight men. On the day of his execution, October 28, 1878, he climbed the steps to the gallows with a cigar in his mouth and told the gathered crowd that his punishment was just and God had forgiven him. After kissing the sheriff and priest and bidding farewell to the crowd, the noose was fitted around his neck, and he was hanged. Unfortunately, the rope slipped so that Longley’s knees hit the ground, denying him a quick and painless death. After the hangman pulled the rope taut once more, the famous killer slowly choked to death. It took 11 minutes before he was finally pronounced dead.
    If we could follow 1 Commandment, 'Love Each Other!', it would be enough! -Apostle Paul

    21 Then I saw ďa new heaven and a new earth,Ē[a] for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea.

    "Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. The real extent of this state of misinformation is known only to those who are in situations to confront facts within their knowledge with the lies of the day." óThomas Jefferson (1807)

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